most-effective-team

 

I was recently reading an article about a small recruitment business in the UK that has just opened its doors and is offering potential new hires unlimited holidays, profit share on all billing, no set working hours, no dress code and no KPIs. It made me think, what are they aiming at?

I then thought what is it that creates a working culture that makes staff want to get out of bed in the morning and really enjoy coming to work. Is it the no KPIs or the no set working hours or is it a nurturing environment, a united team and opportunities for growth in their career?

We have a great team at TwoScots and I feel very proud of our culture but we do believe in structure. We don’t offer unlimited holidays, we believe in corporate attire (albeit continue to debate on tie or no tie internally), we also believe in working hours and loose KPIs.

These may provide the backbone to the business, but they do not determine our culture here at TwoScots. It is the challenges and opportunities that we offer our staff alongside our support, encouragement and a positive environment in which to work. We provide our staff with the chance to learn and grow and it is this that makes them loyal and hard-working and, as a team, we continue to have the results to show for it.

From years of working within the recruitment industry (yes I may be showing my age here), I understand that it is without doubt the team and the culture that underpin a successful business. Without this, you can pretty much stop right where you started. In the words of Richard Branson: “I truly believe that if you take care of your employees, they will take care of your business.”

Having out grown our current office we are in the process of looking into new offices, surely the decor of this office and the feeling when you walk through the door is more important to consultants than unlimited holidays? Should we be discussing a break out area with a ping pong table, pool table, TV, indoor bowling or no KPIs and no dress code.

Jeremy  Jeremy_colour